Steadfast Pat's History Blog RSS

In the aftermath of the French and Indian War, which ended in 1763, thousands of British soldiers were stationed throughout the American colonies. At the time, the colonists saw them as protectors, a defense against potential threats from both the French and Native Americans. However, in the ensuing years, as tensions between the British and their American colonies worsened, the British troops were increasingly seen as an occupying force. In Boston, where nearly one-tenth of the city’s population were British soldiers, relations between Bostonians and the British military were particularly fractious.On a snowy night in March of 1770, a group...

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For twenty-first-century Americans, big government is nothing new. No matter how we feel about it, the government is everywhere and involved in virtually every aspect of our lives. With the federal government responsible for so many facets of our lives, it can be challenging to remember that it was once much smaller. The Constitution—now revered by most Americans—was a source of controversy when it was written. The newly formed United States’ first written constitution was the Articles of Confederation, which created a federal government with limited powers while leaving considerable powers to the states. In the eighteenth century, most people...

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In March of 1911, the nation was shocked by what would prove to be one of the worst workplace disasters in United States history. The disaster was even more tragic because many of those who died were young women just on the cusp of adulthood—some were as young as 14.Employees at the Triangle Shirtwaist Company (a shirtwaist was a woman’s blouse) were like many factory workers in the early twentieth century. They worked long hours—usually, 7 AM to 8 PM, seven days a week, and their wages were absurdly low. A week’s work earned them roughly $6. In some instances,...

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One of the most influential feminists of the 1800s was Elizabeth Cady Stanton. She was born in Johnstown, New York, in 1815, to a prominent family. Although women typically were not given much more than a basic education, Elizabeth was educated at Emma Willard's Troy Female Seminary.

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As the subject of a recent movie and with talk of placing her image on the twenty-dollar bill, Harriet Tubman is perhaps more in the news today than at any point since her death. With so much attention focused on Tubman, let’s look at the life of this remarkable woman. Most people know her as the “conductor” of the Underground Railroad, but there is much more to Tubman’s life than her experiences helping escaped slaves. Born in about 1820 as Araminta “Minty” Ross, she would later take the name Harriet in honor of her mother. As an enslaved person, Harriet...

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